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The regulatory genome gene regulatory networks in development and evolution by Eric H. Davidson

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Published by Academic in Oxford .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Genetic regulation,
  • Developmental genetics

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementEric Davidson.
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 289 p. :
Number of Pages289
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20024015M
ISBN 100120885638
OCLC/WorldCa61756485

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The Regulatory Genome: Gene Regulatory Networks In Development And Evolution - Kindle edition by Davidson, Eric H.. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Regulatory Genome: Gene Regulatory Networks In Development And Evolution.4/4(4). The Regulatory Genome book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. Gene regulatory networks are the most complex, extensive control sys /5(17). Get this from a library! The regulatory genome: gene regulatory networks in development and evolution. [Eric H Davidson] -- A successor to Eric Davidson's . "The Regulatory Genome offers evo-devo aficionados an intellectual masterpiece to praise or to pan but impossible to ignore. Although there is clearly still much to learn about the evolution of gene networks and how these in turn constrain evolution, Davidson has placed a cornerstone for the comparative analysis of gene regulatory networks.

  The Regulatory Genome beautifully explains the control of animal development in terms of structure/function relations of inherited regulatory DNA sequence, and the emergent properties of the gene regulatory networks composed of these sequences. New insights into the mechanisms of body plan evolution are derived from considerations of the 3/5(1).   "The Regulatory Genome offers evo-devo aficionados an intellectual masterpiece to praise or to pan but impossible to ignore. Although there is clearly still much to learn about the evolution of gene networks and how these in turn constrain evolution, Davidson has placed a cornerstone for the comparative analysis of gene regulatory : Eric H. Davidson. of genomic regulatory systems capable of information processing is what made animal evolution possible. This book begins with an overview of the regulatory genome and the concept of information processing in gene regulation (Chapter 1). It proceeds to an in-depth analysis of modular cis-regulatory designs for generation of spatial pat-. The Regulatory Genome beautifully explains the control of animal development in terms of structure/function relations of inherited regulatory DNA sequence, and the emergent properties of the gene regulatory networks composed of these sequences. New insights into the mechanisms of body plan evolution are derived from considerations of the Brand: Elsevier Science.

The Regulatory Genome offers evo-devo aficionados an intellectual masterpiece to praise or to pan but impossible to ignore. Although there is clearly still much to learn about the evolution of gene networks and how these in turn constrain evolution, Davidson has placed a cornerstone for the comparative analysis of gene regulatory networks. The regulatory genome controls genome activity throughout the life of an organism. This requires that complex information processing functions are Author: E. Davidson. This is what is known as the regulatory genome, a term coined by Eric H. Davidson. In this review, we examine what we know about gene regulation from a genomic point of view, revise the current in silico, in vitro and in vivo methodological approaches to study transcriptional regulation, and point to the power of phylogenetic footprinting as a Cited by: Genome: The Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters is a popular science book by the science writer Matt Ridley, published by Fourth chapters are numbered for the pairs of human chromosomes, one pair being the X and Y sex chromosomes, so the numbering goes up to The book was welcomed by critics in journals such as Nature and newspapers Author: Matt Ridley.